Search curation delivers better results

Everything is on the Internet, and that’s the problem. Because everything is there, it makes the one thing you’re looking for hard to find.    It’s somewhat easier if you’re looking for a particular item that’s a paid for business service. Flights and hotels bookings are pretty straightforward and we could all find a flight from London to Paris. However, despite the simplicity of this search, there are numerous aggregators of services. Some show all of the flights, others all of the hotels. Some put both together.

But the sites that attract most views are those that curate the search experience. These sites ask for or understand our requirements. They answer questions like Winter Sun or Short City Breaks.

This is not a common approach in local government, perhaps this is the next area where curation might help the someone find the things they need. A citizen might need to view all the local government services for a family living in a house, or services for a single person living on their own in a flat. This curation should aim to make sure that citizens understand what is available to them.

For older people, this is even more important. Services should be simple to find and in one place, curated for need and provide access to health, social care, voluntary and commercial provision.   They need to be appropriately segmented to keep things simple.  There are plenty of designs for that.  “people that booked A also booked B.”

Should local government only choose to provide answers to citizens needs from their own resources they will fail to access the less costly and sometimes more effective voluntary and commercial services. At BriteLives that’s our mission, put all the services in one place and make them easy to find and book.

Just realised you’re a carer? Three things it’s good to know now.

Lesson 1  – Don’t be passive in any situation, I don’t care how senior they are or what specialist knowledge they have.

Right off the bat I realised I needed to be the decision maker; I felt that there were some occasions when I thought someone else was the decision maker?  This was never the case, at the bedside in a hospital ward, during some social care meeting or just choosing a hairdresser to come to the house; I realised I had to make all of the decisions. That does not mean I did not include my Mother in these decisions, but it became pretty clear all decisions would have to be made by me.

This is particularly the case in healthcare situations. During my Mother’s last stay in Hospital, which should have been a short one, I quickly realised that the ward staff were unable to make any decisions about my Mother. She was not well enough to go home without a care package and no one could decide how big that would be or who should provide it.  So we kept going round and round in circles with me asking their advice.  I found I had to guard against being passive and learnt how to challenge decisions that were or were not being taken.

Lesson 2-  When someone tells you something check both you and they understand what they are saying.

People called me out to the blue and started chatting about my Mother and her needs. This initially seemed like good news.  On at least two occasions I realised that they were not talking about my Mother, some transposition of phone numbers on a list perhaps.  So when I  got one of these calls I did the following:

  • Asked them to identify themselves
  • Got their contact details –  I always did this first. Get their general contact details to and their specific job title.
  • I recorded all of these interactions into an Evernote Notebook; you can, of course, use a paper notebook
  • I confirmed who they thought they were talking about –  I did this through active questions like; “ You wish to discuss Mavis Coulthard with me who’s on Ward XX at the Royal Surrey Hospital?  Is that correct?
  • I would then confirm who they thought they are talking to.
  • Then and only then would I have the conversation
  • Finally, I would confirm the agreed actions back to the caller.

Lesson 3 – Write it all down and keep your eyes and ears open

Don’t rely on your memory, write everything down how ever trivial it might be.  A mobile phone camera is really good at capturing complex meds and forms.   I found that I was often the only person that had all of the information.  The last hospital discharge letter, a list of the latest meds, the name of the intravenous antibiotic Mum was on.  I found that no one seemed to have the right information at the right time.  More of this in another Post.

Once my Mother was discharged from the Royal Surrey Hospital without any medication.  At the time, she was on about 13 different pills.  Fortunately, I had a photo of her medications and the schedule associated with them.  I was able to send this to a local pharmacy and they were able to sort out the mess with some help from my Mother’s GP. Without that intervention, I guess Mum would have been back in Hospital that night.  The healthcare ombudsman has recently published a report into the discharge of older people from hospital.  It does not make good reading.

I found I needed to be aware of the conversations around me and my Mother, I read all of her medical notes, I asked open-ended questions and listened hard to the answers.  I found it easier and easier to challenge the jargon. The NHS loves jargon, three and four letter acronyms abound and I just asked what they meant.  Sometimes not even the user knew what they stood for.

 

Pimp your podcast listening.

Over the last month, I have pimped by mobile phone podcast experience. Having used a fruit based product as my mobile for some years, I was happy to see the native Podcast app arrive with a recent upgrade. It has the advantage of being free (never underestimate the power of free in any marketing plan).

But I now prefer the heterogeneous world Android, so I have spent some time choosing an App. The best review I could find was on The Verge  so my choice is Shift Jelly’s Pocket Cast. If you don’t want to pay for an App then I think Stitcher is the best option. Now it’s just a matter of which casts? Here is my somewhat eclectic list:

From the BBChttp://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/radio

  • In Our Time – has an extra bit on the end
  • Thinking Allowed
  • The Media Show
  • Front Row
  • Kermode & Mayo’s Film review – much more than just a repeat of the radio show

From The Economisthttp://www.economist.com/audio-edition

  • Editor’s Picks

From Penguinhttps://www.penguin.co.uk/articles/book-talk/

  • Penguin Podcast with Richard E Grant

Independent –  http://www.stitcher.com/stitcher-list/all-podcasts-top-shows

  • The Journal by Kevin Rose
  • The Pen Addict
  • Cortex

Leadership in the NHS and why it may be looking in the wrong direction.

There should be a thought at the heart of every organisation; are we doing good or ill? In Microsoft we worried about a new found monopoly and we engaged with this through responsible leadership. We understood that our role as managers had to change, we had a responsibility to our partners and customers beyond just making money for our shareholders. And over a number of years we became a better group of leaders.

In the NHS I am not sure we have yet to fully understand the constraints and opportunities afforded to us by our health and social care monopoly in England. Monopolies nearly always display a number of traits:

  • A lack of transparency
  • Poor levels of service.
  • No or low consumer power.
  • high prices for low quality goods and services.
  • out dated goods and services with little or no innovation.

I believe that these ought to be leadership concerns of NHS England.

Despite rises in medical legal costs through greater insurance payouts and premiums, the Francis Report and the Institute of Customer Service Report 2014,that shows lower and lower levels of customer satisfaction within the NHS, the NHS has yet to focus managers in the same way as those of the commercial sector near monopolies.

It may that the NHS has never really developed, in organisational terms, beyond the passive aggressive org that Neilson so graphically describes in his Harvard Business Review article.

It’s time we all demanded more of NHS leadership, the call for privatisation is the wrong way of tackling the issues of lack of competition. NHS Leaders should address the monopoly traits. This could be achieved through greater transparency, and by commissioning services for improvements in public, patient and professional experience.

There is some light at the end of the tunnel, the Kings Fund paper Reforming the NHS… is a very good place to start. But until the traits are on the agenda of every NHS leader we are not going to make progress.

Governments and Information

I was sitting in a meeting a couple of years ago discussing how governments used personal data,in the room were high panjandrums from every department of state plus a few people from civil liberty and allied organisations.

We came to the point when someone suggested that truly joined up personal information available to all government departments would be a real benefit for the citizen.

The libertarians were horrified. They were worried that Healthcare data could be cross matched with welfare payments and when discrepancies were found the citizen could be tried, convicted, a prison space made available and the Police would snatch the person from home and take them directly there.

I pointed out that it would be worse than that. The reality would be that data would be wrong and before we knew it the Government would be correcting us instead of the data. In my case I presume some surgical operation would be conducted to remove 10inches from my height to make sure it matched the “Official Data.” I can think of worse errors!

Governments think they know so much about us but in reality the real danger comes from companies like BT and Google. This TED talk explains the concern.