Leadership in the NHS and why it may be looking in the wrong direction.

There should be a thought at the heart of every organisation; are we doing good or ill? In Microsoft we worried about a new found monopoly and we engaged with this through responsible leadership. We understood that our role as managers had to change, we had a responsibility to our partners and customers beyond just making money for our shareholders. And over a number of years we became a better group of leaders.

In the NHS I am not sure we have yet to fully understand the constraints and opportunities afforded to us by our health and social care monopoly in England. Monopolies nearly always display a number of traits:

  • A lack of transparency
  • Poor levels of service.
  • No or low consumer power.
  • high prices for low quality goods and services.
  • out dated goods and services with little or no innovation.

I believe that these ought to be leadership concerns of NHS England.

Despite rises in medical legal costs through greater insurance payouts and premiums, the Francis Report and the Institute of Customer Service Report 2014,that shows lower and lower levels of customer satisfaction within the NHS, the NHS has yet to focus managers in the same way as those of the commercial sector near monopolies.

It may that the NHS has never really developed, in organisational terms, beyond the passive aggressive org that Neilson so graphically describes in his Harvard Business Review article.

It’s time we all demanded more of NHS leadership, the call for privatisation is the wrong way of tackling the issues of lack of competition. NHS Leaders should address the monopoly traits. This could be achieved through greater transparency, and by commissioning services for improvements in public, patient and professional experience.

There is some light at the end of the tunnel, the Kings Fund paper Reforming the NHS… is a very good place to start. But until the traits are on the agenda of every NHS leader we are not going to make progress.

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